Tag Archives: eBook

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer: Part V

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants Detecting cancer at an early stage can make it much more treatable. Developing tests and making them clinically actionable is crucial to beat this disease. This eBook covers the state-of-the-art gene panel tests for cancer. Of course, there is more that can be done. The field is… Read more »

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer: Part IV

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants Somatic variants can manifest in different ways: Single Nucleotide Variants Indels Fusions and Copy Number Variations There is a difference between the interpretation of germline and somatic variants. The former is exclusively focused on establishing the level of pathogenicity vis a vis a particular disease. In contrast… Read more »

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer: Part III

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants As described in my eBook “Genetic Testing for Cancer,” any bioinformatic pipeline for cancer ultimately calls variants based on the aligned reads that the sequencer generated. Variant calling is the process of reviewing a sequence alignment, typically in the form of a BAM file, to identify loci… Read more »

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer: Part II

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants Analogous to the ACMG guidelines for germline mutations, the Association for Molecular Pathologists (AMP) has issued guidelines to assess and report on somatic variants. The key paper in this area was published by Li et. al (2017) with the title “Standards and Guidelines for the Interpretation and… Read more »

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer: Part I

Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants Precision Medicine uses genetic information from individual patients. This may include the following areas: Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Specifically, in the cancer space, data derived from Next-Gen Sequencing (NGS) is used to diagnose and prognose diseases, select a targeted therapy and potentially evaluate the suitability of a patient… Read more »

New eBook Release: Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer

Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants Today, I am thrilled to share with you the launch of a brand new eBook titled “Clinical Variant Analysis for Cancer – Applying AMP Guidelines to Analyze Somatic Variants”. We would happy to send you a complimentary copy which can be requested on our website here. The clinical utilization of Next-Gen Sequencing data… Read more »

Genetic Testing for Cancer – New Version Release

Yesterday, I released a new version of my eBook, “Genetic Testing for Cancer – Third Edition”. We would be happy to send you one! To download a complimentary copy, please submit a request on our site here. In 1914, the German cytologist Theodor Boveri coined the phrase “Cancer is a disease of the genome.” At this time, his ideas were… Read more »

Secondary Analysis 3.0 – New Version Release

We have released a new version of my eBook, “Secondary Analysis 3.0”. To download a complimentary copy, I encourage you to do so here. Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) promises to be the ultimate paradigm when it comes to genetic research and clinical testing since it contains the complete genetic information. When it comes to the current reality in testing labs, there… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part VI

reporting incidental genetic findings

With a properly defined wet-lab and bioinformatics process, we are able to zero in on clinically relevant variants. How does a lab report on the outcome of their analysis? We find that most laboratories conduct their variant classification based on the guidelines formulated by the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) for inherited diseases. The ACMG guidelines for variant classification… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part V

Quality Managment

Any validated bioinformatics pipeline must be continuously monitored. Quality management in clinical testing labs ensures that any divergence from predefined quality metrics during the analysis of clinical samples is investigated. For example: There is an insufficient number of sequence reads that passed the predefined base quality score threshold The number of variants identified in a data set may deviate substantially… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part IV

clinical testing

After the Wet Lab process has been completed, the bioinformatics analysis of the sequencing data work begins. The next three blogs will focus on three aspects of this process. The building blocks of a bioinformatics pipeline, documentation and validation (today’s topic) Quality Management Clinical Reporting The Building Blocks of an NGS PipelineThe bioinformatics process to analyze NGS data occurs in three… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part III

DNA sequencing

Getting the NGS wet bench process right is not a small undertaking. Targeted NGS assays such as multigene panels or exome sequencing allow for the targeted analysis of genomic regions that are of particular interest. For every sample type, e.g. blood, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, saliva etc, there must be a detailed protocol in place outlining how each sample type is going… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part II

ngs-based clinical testing

We have come a long way since Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) evolved as a set of technologies in the 1970s. The higher throughput and rapid reduction of costs associated with NGS have lead to the accelerated adoption of clinical testing that we are experiencing today. Currently, it is applied to analyze inherited diseases, tumors, hematologic malignancies and infectious diseases. It is… Read more »

NGS-Based Clinical Testing: Part I

NGS Testing

The adoption of genetic services is key to our ability to provide personalized medicine in the future. The goal is to better diagnose diseases, predict their outcome, and choose the best possible care option for a patient. We still have a long way to go to achieve this goal. While there is agreement about the ultimate goal, there is still… Read more »