Category Archives: Big picture

A few thoughts from IGES

         September 18, 2014

Late last month I had the opportunity to attend one of my favorite events: the annual meeting of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society (IGES).  This year’s conference was held in Vienna, in conjunction with the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) and the International Society for Clinical Biostatistics (ICBS).  The program at IGES this year was very diverse, with content ranging from… Read more »

False Positives in Big Data Analytics

         September 2, 2014

We had a lot to celebrate recently. Last year was the 300th anniversary of Jacob Bernoulli’s Ars Conjectandi. In this book he consolidated central ideas in probability theory, such as the very first version of the law of large numbers. It was also the 250th anniversary of  Bayes theorem named after Thomas Bayes (1701–1761), who first suggested using the theorem to update beliefs.

Leveraging SVS for NGS Workflows

         August 19, 2014

Over the last decade, DNA sequencing has made vast technological improvements. With the cost of sequencing decreasing significantly, sequencing technology has become a product for the masses. The sequencing technology and programs that were once used exclusively by major research institutions are now becoming available in many research facilities around the globe. These tools produce large amounts of data sets… Read more »

RefSeq Genes: Updated to NCBI Provided Alignments and Why You Care

         August 14, 2014

You probably haven’t spent much time thinking about how we represent genes in a genomic reference sequence context. And by genes, I really mean transcripts since genes are just a collection of transcripts that produce the same product. But in fact, there is more complexity here than you ever really wanted to know about. Andrew Jesaitis covered some of this… Read more »

SVS 8.2 – New Capabilities and Features

         August 7, 2014

Earlier this year we completed the marriage of SVS and GenomeBrowse. When we released Version 8 of SVS we completed a major engineering task. A lot of things under the hood of both products had been changed to create a seamless experience for our users. The new and improved SVS platform is based on a technology stack that allows us… Read more »

Adding Value Through Golden Helix Services

         April 9, 2014

As I write this article, Golden Helix has hundreds of clients in top research institutions world-wide. The adoption of our product at these institutions ranges from a few individual users to site licenses used by entire organizations. Because of the quality of SNP & Variation Suite (SVS) and GenomeBrowse, our competence in the field is recognized, and increasingly our clients… Read more »

Preparing the Next Generation of Genetic Researchers

         March 25, 2014

New breakthroughs are being made every day in genomics. It’s a dynamic and fascinating industry, and with exceptional growth forecast in the DNA sequencing market, a new generation of people are entering the field: future researchers, clinicians, counselors and doctors. This new generation will need to learn not only the science, but also understand how to process the massive amounts… Read more »

The Next Phase in Our Evolution

         May 8, 2013

Time goes by fast. With the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, scientists worldwide were trying to understand the cause and effect of variations in the genome as they relate to functionalities, traits and disease. Along the way, we at Golden Helix helped researchers analyze data, discover variations and draw conclusions. It turns out that the real bottleneck… Read more »

Mendelspod Podcast with Dr. Lambert: Looking at the Big Picture of Bioinformatics

         April 17, 2013

Recently, Dr. Christophe Lambert joined the esteemed Theral Timpson over at Mendelspod to talk a bit about the big picture of bioinformatics. This 37 minute podcast references a recent blog post by Christophe on Illumina competing with its customers, the notion that if the end user isn’t buying that no one is selling, and learning from our GWAS mistakes. One… Read more »

Is Illumina Aiming to Compete with its Customers?

         February 12, 2013

In a recent GenomeWeb article by Tony Fong, “Sequenom’s CEO ‘Puzzled’ by Illumina’s Buy of Verinata, Lays out 2013 Goals at JP Morgan,” Harry Hixson, Sequenom’s CEO, expresses puzzlement over why its major supplier, Illumina, is acquiring a Sequenom competitor in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), and thus apparently competing with one of its major customers. In a JP Morgan interview… Read more »

To Find a Killer Variant: Successes and Challenges on the Journey to Mass Adoption of NGS in the Clinic

         October 22, 2012

Recently, I have been spending some time analyzing real patient data. I’m preparing for a webcast I’ll be giving in which I will walk through the process of replicating the findings of Dr. Gholson Lyon‘s study on the novel disease diagnosis he named Ogden Syndrome. Being so close to data that comes directly from clinical settings got me thinking about… Read more »

Learning vs. Doing (or why that Ph.D. took 10 years)

         August 15, 2012

What prevents scientists from being more productive and if we knew, could we do anything about it? I’d like to look at an often overlooked, but huge productivity inhibitor — bad multitasking. Many people put “excellent multitasker” on their resume as a badge of honor. We laud the efficiency of a good multitasker — they are rarely idle — someone… Read more »

Have We Wasted 7 Years and $100 Million Dollars on GWAS Studies?

         June 21, 2012

Type 2 Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Obesity, Chrohn’s Diseases and Coronary Heart Disease are examples of common, chronic diseases that have a significant genetic component. It should be no surprise that these diseases have been the target of much genetic research. Yet over the past decade, the tools of our research efforts have failed to unravel the complete biological architecture of… Read more »

Is Free Software Really Free?

         May 23, 2012

The prevalence of open-source bioinformatic tools in the genetic research space is enormous. According to The North Shore LIJ Research Institute, there are over 500 genetic analysis software packages – the great majority of which are free – as of August 2010. Open-source tools are incredibly important in genetics. They allow new methodologies to be created and expanded. They tie… Read more »

Learning From Our GWAS Mistakes: From experimental design to scientific method

         March 7, 2012

This month Biostatistics published online an open access article I co-authored with Dr. Laura Black from Montana State University: “Learning From Our GWAS Mistakes: From Experimental Design To Scientific Method.” The paper version is expected to come out in the April 2012 issue. I’m hoping that you will take the time to read it. And I’m hoping you will violently… Read more »

Leaky Sprinklers and “The Future of NGS Market Study 2011”

         November 23, 2011

Have you ever chosen to do something yourself instead of paying money for the alternative, when, in the long run, the alternative is not really that expensive? We all have, as we all have limited budgets. One particular example comes to mind in my own life. My boyfriend, Ben, and I bought a house in April. Unfortunately, it wasn’t properly… Read more »