Category Archives: Best practices in genetic analysis

Analyzing Whole Exome, Large-n Cohorts in SVS

It’s come to my attention in recent weeks, through various customer interactions, that many are not aware of the fantastic functionalities that exist in SNP and Variation Suite (SVS) for large-n DNASeq workflows; this includes large cohort analyses with case/control variables. The data you’ll see below is the publically available 1kG Phase 1 v3 Exome sequences from 1,092 individuals with… Read more »

New Plugin for Ion Torrent Server

Golden Helix is proud to announce the release of the Golden Helix GenomeBrowse Plugin for Ion Torrent server. The new plug-in enables adding selected BAM files from Torrent Server reports directly into GenomeBrowse. The BAM files remain on the torrent server and are streamed from the server on demand using your credentials. This feature allows GenomeBrowse users to visualize genomic… Read more »

Variant Notation: In simplicity we find complexity

Recently, I have been thinking a lot about Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) notation — you know “G dot”, “P dot”, and “C dot”. HGVS has quickly become one of the most common ways to represent variants.  It’s no wonder that HGVS nomenclature is used so widely. It provides an easily readable, compact representation of a variant. Since it is… Read more »

Top 3 Most Viewed Tutorials from Golden Helix

Tutorials are ever-present in the world today, and for good reason. Why struggle through a complicated process yourself, when there is already a guide established to assist? While no one would suggest that a tutorial is the only way to complete a project, it is certainly a nice starting point. This rings true with genetic software as well. There are… Read more »

Top 5 Webcasts to Watch at GoldenHelix.com

Genomic research is exploding. There is a plethora of new methods and workflows for research and clinical use. While we are a software company at heart, we find ourselves in the role of educators. Our customer interactions are about informing, teaching, and consulting. A few years back, we started with regular webcasts that took this idea to the next level…. Read more »

Leveraging SVS for NGS Workflows

Over the last decade, DNA sequencing has made vast technological improvements. With the cost of sequencing decreasing significantly, sequencing technology has become a product for the masses. The sequencing technology and programs that were once used exclusively by major research institutions are now becoming available in many research facilities around the globe. These tools produce large amounts of data sets… Read more »

RefSeq Genes: Updated to NCBI Provided Alignments and Why You Care

You probably haven’t spent much time thinking about how we represent genes in a genomic reference sequence context. And by genes, I really mean transcripts since genes are just a collection of transcripts that produce the same product. But in fact, there is more complexity here than you ever really wanted to know about. Andrew Jesaitis covered some of this… Read more »

Runs of Homozygosity Updated

      Alison Figueira    August 12, 2014    No Comments on Runs of Homozygosity Updated

For the SVS 8.2 release we decided to improve upon the existing ROH feature. The improvements include new parameters to define a run and a new clustering algorithm to aide in finding more stringent clusters of runs. The improvements were motivated by customer comments and a recent research paper by Zhang 2013, “cgaTOH: Extended Approach for Identifying Tracts of Homozygosity,”… Read more »

Have you ever had a bad experience with a VCF file?

“Who has ever had a bad experience with a VCF file?” I like to ask that question to the audience when I present data analysis workshops for Golden Helix. The question invariably draws laughter as many people raise their hands in the affirmative. It seems that just about everybody who has ever worked VCF files has encountered some sort of… Read more »

The State of Variant Annotation: A Comparison of AnnoVar, snpEff and VEP

Up until a few weeks ago, I thought variant classification was basically a solved problem. I mean, how hard can it be? We look at variants all the time and say things like, “Well that one is probably not too detrimental since it’s a 3 base insertion, but this frameshift is worth looking into.” What we fail to recognize is… Read more »

The New Human Genome Reference and Clinical Grade Annotations: It’s All About the Coordinates

On my flight back from this year’s Molecular Tri-Conference in San Francisco, I couldn’t help but ruminate over the intriguing talks, engaging round table discussions, and fabulous dinners with fellow speakers. And I kept returning to the topic of how we aggregate, share, and update data in the interest of understanding our genomes. Of course, there were many examples of… Read more »

Public Data? What’s that good for anyway?

Dr. Bryce Christensen recently gave a webcast on Maximizing Public Data Sources for Sequencing and GWAS Studies in which he covered options for getting GWAS and sequence information online, tips for working with these datasets and what you’ll see in terms of data quality and usefulness, how to use public data sources in conjunction with your GWAS or sequence study… Read more »

Guest Post: Finding Rare Pieces of Hay in a Haystack

Utilizing Identical Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia to Uncover de novo Mutations We are living in exciting times – the reality of high-resolution Cand individual genome sequencing now offers renewed hope in the search for the causes of complex diseases. When this technology is combined with genetic relationships, individual sequences add unrivaled proficiency. Our lab is located in London, Ontario, Canada… Read more »

More Mixed Model Methods!

      Golden Helix    June 6, 2013    4 Comments on More Mixed Model Methods!

Thanks to everyone for the great webcast yesterday. We had over 850 people register for the event and actually broke the record! Take that Bryce and Gabe! If you would like to see the recording, view it at: Mixed Models: How to Effectively Account for Inbreeding and Population Structure in GWAS. While preparing for this webcast, we chose to focus… Read more »

Upcoming webcast – Mixed Models: How to Effectively Account for Inbreeding and Population Structure in GWAS

Presenter: Greta Linse Peterson, Senior Statistician Date: Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 Time: 12:00 pm EDT, 60 minutes Abstract Population structure and inbreeding can confound results from a standard genome-wide association test. Accounting for the random effect of relatedness can lead to lower false discovery rates and identify the causative markers without over-correcting and dampening the true signal. This presentation will… Read more »

Population Structure + Genetic Background + Environment = Mixed Model

A few months ago, our CEO, Christophe Lambert, directed me toward an interesting commentary published in Nature Reviews Genetics by authors Bjarni J. Vilhjalmsson and Magnus Nordborg.  Population structure is frequently cited as a major source of confounding in GWAS, but the authors of the article suggest that the problems often blamed on population structure actually result from the environment… Read more »

Follow Along on an Analyst’s Journey to Filter Whole Genome Data to Four Candidate Variants in SVS

Last week Khanh-Nhat Tran-Viet, Manager/Research Analyst II at Duke University, presented the webcast: Insights: Identification of Candidate Variants using Exome Data in Ophthalmic Genetics. (That link has the recording if you are interested in viewing.) In it, Khanh-Nhat highlighted tools available in SVS that might be under used or were recently updated. These tools were used in his last three… Read more »

GATK is a Research Tool. Clinics Beware.

In preparation for a webcast I’ll be giving on Wednesday on my own exome, I’ve been spending more time with variant callers and the myriad of false-positives one has to wade through to get to interesting, or potentially significant, variants. So recently, I was happy to see a message in my inbox from the 23andMe exome team saying they had… Read more »

A Conversation with 1000 Genomes Analysis Group Member: Jeffrey Rosenfeld

After my latest blog post, Jeffrey Rosenfeld reached out to me. Jeff is a member of the Analysis Group of the 1000 Genomes Project and shared some fascinating insights that I got permission to share here: Hi Gabe, I saw your great blog post about the problems in the lack of overlap between Complete Genomics and 1000 Genomes data.  I… Read more »

Dr. Ken Kaufman’s Webcast on Exome Sequencing Wildly Successful

Thank you to everyone who joined us yesterday for a webcast by Dr. Ken Kaufman of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital: “Identification of Candidate Functional Polymorphism Using Trio Family Whole Exome DNA Data.” Over 750 people registered for this event and 430 attended – a new Golden Helix record! If you missed the webcast (or would like to watch it again), the… Read more »