Author Archives: Gabe Rudy

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About Gabe Rudy

Meet Gabe Rudy, GHI’s Vice President of Product and Engineering and team member since 2002. Gabe thrives in the dynamic and fast-changing field of bioinformatics and genetic analysis. Leading a killer team of Computer Scientists and Statisticians in building powerful products and providing world-class support, Gabe puts his passion into enabling Golden Helix’s customers to accelerate their research. When not reading or blogging, Gabe enjoys the outdoor Montana lifestyle. But most importantly, Gabe truly loves spending time with his sons, daughter, and wife. Follow Gabe on Twitter @gabeinformatics.

  

RefSeq Genes: Updated to NCBI Provided Alignments and Why You Care

         August 14, 2014

You probably haven’t spent much time thinking about how we represent genes in a genomic reference sequence context. And by genes, I really mean transcripts since genes are just a collection of transcripts that produce the same product. But in fact, there is more complexity here than you ever really wanted to know about. Andrew Jesaitis covered some of this… Read more »

The New Human Genome Reference and Clinical Grade Annotations: It’s All About the Coordinates

         February 17, 2014

On my flight back from this year’s Molecular Tri-Conference in San Francisco, I couldn’t help but ruminate over the intriguing talks, engaging round table discussions, and fabulous dinners with fellow speakers. And I kept returning to the topic of how we aggregate, share, and update data in the interest of understanding our genomes. Of course, there were many examples of… Read more »

All I Want for Christmas Is a New File Format for Genomics

         December 16, 2013

Tis the season of quiet, productive hours. I’ve been spending a lot of mine thinking about file formats. Actually, I’ve been spending mine implementing a new one, but more on that later. File formats are amazingly important in big data science. In genomics, it is hard not to be awed by how successful the BAM file format is. I thought… Read more »

The Murky Waters of Variant Nomenclature – You Could Be Missing Vital Information

         May 6, 2013

When researchers realized they needed a way to report genetic variants in scientific literature using a consistent format, the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) mutation nomenclature was developed and quickly became the standard method for describing sequence variations. Increasingly, HGVS nomenclature is being used to describe variants in genetic variant databases as well. There are some practical issues that researchers… Read more »

The State of NGS Variant Calling: DON’T PANIC!!

         March 25, 2013

I’m a believer in the signal. Whole genomes and exomes have lots of signal. Man, is it cool to look at a pile-up and see a mutation as clear as day that you arrived at after filtering through hundreds of thousands or even millions of candidates. When these signals sit right in the genomic “sweet spot” of mappable regions with… Read more »

What Can Exomes Tell Us About the Pathology of Complex Disorders?

         February 26, 2013

My investigation into my wife’s rare autoimmune disease I recently got invited to speak at the plenary session of AGBT about my experience in receiving and interpreting my Direct to Consumer (DTC) exomes. I’ve touched on this before in my post discussing my own exome and a caution for clinical labs setting up a GATK pipeline based on buggy variants… Read more »

GATK is a Research Tool. Clinics Beware.

         December 3, 2012

In preparation for a webcast I’ll be giving on Wednesday on my own exome, I’ve been spending more time with variant callers and the myriad of false-positives one has to wade through to get to interesting, or potentially significant, variants. So recently, I was happy to see a message in my inbox from the 23andMe exome team saying they had… Read more »

Upcoming Webcast: 23andMe Variant Analysis of My Personal Exome

         November 28, 2012

Join me on December 5th for a one-hour webcast as I explore my personal exome provided by the Exome Pilot project of 23andMe. Exome sequencing has seen many success stories in the realm of diagnosing highly penetrant monogenic disorders as well as in informing treatment of certain cancers. As the use of exome sequencing expands to more complex polygenic disorders… Read more »

To Find a Killer Variant: Successes and Challenges on the Journey to Mass Adoption of NGS in the Clinic

         October 22, 2012

Recently, I have been spending some time analyzing real patient data. I’m preparing for a webcast I’ll be giving in which I will walk through the process of replicating the findings of Dr. Gholson Lyon‘s study on the novel disease diagnosis he named Ogden Syndrome. Being so close to data that comes directly from clinical settings got me thinking about… Read more »

One Track to Rule Them All: Close but not quite from the 1000 Genomes Project

         July 31, 2012

I recently curated the latest population frequency catalog from the 1000 Genomes Project onto our annotation servers, and I had very high hopes for this track. First of all, I applaud 1000 Genomes for the amount of effort they have put in to providing the community with the largest set of high-quality whole genome controls available. My high hopes are… Read more »

My 23andMe Trio Exomes Arrived: Sneak Peek

         July 18, 2012

There is nothing cooler than having something arrive that you have been excitedly waiting for: last week I got an email notification that my 23andMe exome results were ready. Actually, I got 3 emails that my exome results were ready. You see, I lucked out. It all began two years ago on DNA day when Hacker News reported that 23andMe… Read more »

Exaggerating your number of controls or being precise? “Variant not found in over 10,000 chromosomes from EVS…”

         June 22, 2012

Reading through the last release of AJHG I saw a couple papers mention that the putative rare variant they were investigating was “not present in over 10,000 control chromosomes from the EVS”. My first reaction was, “What? Do they mean the NHLBI 5400 Exome Sequencing Project? They only have 5,400 exomes not over 10,000! I wonder if there is some… Read more »

Admixture in Reference Populations: 1000 Genomes Uses African Americans in African Reference Group

         June 22, 2012

Today I ran into an interesting fact about how a prolifically used catalog of population controls classifies African Americans with potential impacts on research outcomes. The 1000 Genomes Project is arguably our best common set of controls used in genomic studies. They recently finished what was termed as “Phase 1” of the project, and they have been releasing full sets… Read more »

Have We Wasted 7 Years and $100 Million Dollars on GWAS Studies?

         June 21, 2012

Type 2 Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Obesity, Chrohn’s Diseases and Coronary Heart Disease are examples of common, chronic diseases that have a significant genetic component. It should be no surprise that these diseases have been the target of much genetic research. Yet over the past decade, the tools of our research efforts have failed to unravel the complete biological architecture of… Read more »

DNA Variant Analysis of Complete Genomics’ Next-Generation Sequencing Data

         August 17, 2011

As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, one of the great aspects of our scientific community is the sharing of public data. With a mission of providing powerful and accurate tools to researchers, we at at Golden Helix especially appreciate the value of having rich and extensive public data to test and calibrate those tools. Public data allow us to… Read more »

NGS Tools and Formats for Secondary Analysis: A Primer

         April 20, 2011

In a series of previous blog posts, I gave an overview of Next Generation Sequencing trends and technologies. In Part Two of the three part series, the range of steps and programs used in the bioinfomatics of NGS data was defined as primary, secondary and tertiary analysis. In Part Three I went into more details on the needs and workflows… Read more »

I Want a GPU for Computational Analysis! Which One Should I Get?

         April 14, 2011

A GPU can produce an enormous boost in performance for many scientific computing applications. Since we announced the availability of SNP & Variation Suite’s incorporation of GPUs to dramatically speed up copy number segmentation, we’ve received numerous inquiries on recommendations for what GPU to purchase. Unfortunately the technical terminology and choices can be a bit confusing. In this article I… Read more »

A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Next Generation Sequencing – Part 3

         January 19, 2011

The advances in DNA sequencing are another magnificent technological revolution that we’re all excited to be a part of. Similar to how the technology of microprocessors enabled the personalization of computers, or how the new paradigms of web 2.0 redefined how we use the internet, high-throughput sequencing machines are defining and driving a new era of biology. Biologists, geneticists, clinicians,… Read more »

A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Next Generation Sequencing – Part 2

         December 9, 2010

When you think about the cost of doing genetic research, it’s no secret that the complexity of bioinformatics has been making data analysis a larger and larger portion of the total cost of a given project or study. With next-gen sequencing data, this reality is rapidly setting in. In fact, if it hasn’t already, it’s been commonly suggested that the… Read more »