Tag Archives: SVS

Meta-Analysis is now available in SVS!

Earlier this spring we announced that Meta-Analysis was coming to SVS very soon. Now, I am pleased to announce that it is available in the latest release of SVS (version 8.4.0). Meta-Analysis takes the results of two or more GWAS studies for multiple SNPs or markers, and standard meta-analysis statistics are then performed on each SNP and the results compiled into… Read more »

Using GWAS to Improve the Economics of the Aquaculture Industry

Recently, customer Xin Geng of Auburn University published a paper using SVS, and we wanted to share his story with you. Please feel free to contact us if you have questions or if you would like to learn more about SVS at info@goldenhelix.com. For PhD graduate student Xin Geng, conducting Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) to uncover the quantitative trait… Read more »

Comparing Variants using a Venn Diagram

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One of the lesser known functions in SVS allows the user to create Venn diagrams comparing variants found in multiple spreadsheets. These different spreadsheets could come from individuals samples, a case vs. control group or several variant databases. It is a helpful tool for visually comparing different variants. Start by creating spreadsheets for each group/samples you’d like to compare. The… Read more »

New and Updated Annotation Tracks Now Available!

In recent months we have been updating our public annotation library to include the most recent versions of existing sources as well as include new sources. Each of these annotation sources are compatible with our three major products (SVS, GenomeBrowse and VarSeq) and can be used for visualization, annotation and filtering. NHLBI ESP6500SI-V2-SSA137 Exomes Variant Frequencies 0.0.30, GHI Annotations are… Read more »

Genomic Prediction

      Andreas Scherer    December 16, 2014    No Comments on Genomic Prediction

The major interest in genomic prediction is best understood by looking at the growth of the human population. Over the last few hundred years we have experienced an increase in population due to medical advances and massive increase in agricultural productivity. The planet’s population continues to explode: from 1 billion in 1820 to 2 billion in 1930, 3 billion in… Read more »