Tag Archives: Golden Helix

Have We Wasted 7 Years and $100 Million Dollars on GWAS Studies?

Type 2 Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Obesity, Chrohn’s Diseases and Coronary Heart Disease are examples of common, chronic diseases that have a significant genetic component. It should be no surprise that these diseases have been the target of much genetic research. Yet over the past decade, the tools of our research efforts have failed to unravel the complete biological architecture of… Read more »

Learning From Our GWAS Mistakes: From experimental design to scientific method

This month Biostatistics published online an open access article I co-authored with Dr. Laura Black from Montana State University: “Learning From Our GWAS Mistakes: From Experimental Design To Scientific Method.” The paper version is expected to come out in the April 2012 issue. I’m hoping that you will take the time to read it. And I’m hoping you will violently… Read more »

Introducing SVS 7.6!

      Delaina Hawkins    February 15, 2012    4 Comments on Introducing SVS 7.6!

It’s that time again! We here at Golden Helix are excited to announce SVS 7.6 with more features for DNA-Seq analysis, the addition of RNA-Seq functionality, reorganization of SVS into “packages” including two new ones, and the release of new plot types enabled by Matplotlib. It’s certainly been busy as we pack all this into the sixth installment of the… Read more »

“Dammit Jim, I’m a doctor, not a bioinformatician!”

Academic Software, Productivity, and Reproducible Research httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGMLCxKPMSE&NR=1 Do you ever feel like Dr. McCoy on Star Trek, where your job and expertise is to do x, but to achieve your goals you also have to do y and z, which you either don’t want to do or don’t have the skills to do? Genetic researchers are faced with this every… Read more »

Missing Heritability and the Future of GWAS

“Where is the missing heritability?” is a question asked frequently in genetic research, usually in the context of diseases that have large heritability estimates, say 60-80%, and yet where only perhaps 5-10% of that heritability has been found. The difficulty seems to come down to the common disease/common variant hypothesis not holding up. Or perhaps more accurately, that the frequency… Read more »